Knitting is just plain awesome; anyone who tells you differently doesn’t know what they’re talking about.  If you know me well then you know that I love to knit.  Like most things that I love in my life, my passion for knitting and crafting came from my family.  Both of my grandmothers, Tommie and Geneva, made beautiful pieces of art out of their crocheting and quilting.  Geneva made a new quilt every time someone in the family got married while Tommie would crochet baby blankets for all of the newest babies in the family.  Grandma Tommie, even though she crocheted, taught me how to knit.  The very first thing she taught me to knit was a tiny little red blanket for a stuffed bear that she had laying around the house.

Within the past few years my knitting has turned from simple scarves, hats, and gloves to beautiful and intricate blankets and afghans that I can’t help but give away to family and friends.  With the arrival of my first nephew, I picked up my grandmothers’ reigns in a way and I decided to knit a baby blanket for every niece and nephew to come along in my lifetime.

My very first baby blanket was for my nephew Thomas, who was named for Grandma Tommie.  The pattern that I used for Thomas’ baby blanket was given to me by a wonderful woman that I met while I was studying abroad in Chile.  I spent many evenings in Chile in front of the TV with my host-family watching bootlegged American movies and knitting Thomas’ baby blanket.  Thomas’ blanket turned out better than I could have imagined: I chose a light yellow and light weight yarn to use for the blanket.

Thomas' Baby Blanket

The pattern itself was seven individual knit panels that were then stitched together with a beautiful border that was then sewn around the entire blanket.

Thomas' Baby Blanket Zoomed

The pattern for Thomas’ blanket can be found at the bottom of this post.

And then came Stella, who was named for my sister-in-law’s grandmother.  The pattern for Stella’s baby blanket came from one of the best knitting books I’ve purchased in a long time: Comfort Knitting & Crochet: Afghans: More Than 50 Beautiful, Affordable Designs Featuring Berroco’s Comfort Yarn (Kindle on Amazon).

Comfort Knitting & Crochet Afghans

This is the original pattern for Stella’s baby blanket:

Swirl Baby Blanket 1

Swirl Baby Blanket 2

I’ve stuck to the pattern, but I’ve changed up the color scheme:

Stella's Baby Blanket 2

Once I finish the baby blanket, which will hopefully be within the next week or two (depending on how crazy life gets) I’ll share a finished picture!

Love,

Sarah

Tommie’s Baby Blanket

Baby afghan measures approximately 35” by 42”

Materials:

  • Sport weight acrylic yarn, 15 oz.
  • Size 5 knitting needles
  • Size 6 knitting needles

Or size to obtain gauge.

Gauge: 25 stitches = 4 ¼”, 14 rows of shell panel repeat = 2”

Shell Panel (make 7)

With larger needles, cast on 25 stitches.

Row 1 (right sides): Knit (k) 3, purl (p) 4, k1, p4, k1, p4, k1, p4, k3.

Row 2 and all even rows: Knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches as they face you.

Row 3: K2, yarn over (yo), k1, p2, p2 together (tog), k1, p4, k1, p4, k1, p 2 tog, p2, k1, yo, k2.

Row 5: K3, yo, k1, p3, k1, p2, p 2 tog, k1, p2 tog, p2, k1, p3, k1, yo, k3.

Row 7: K4, yo, k1, p1, p 2 tog, k1, p3, k1, p3, k1, p 2 tog, p1, k1, yo, k4.

Row 9: K5, yo, k1 ,p2, k1, p1, p 2 tog, k1, p 2 tog, p1, k1, p2, k1, yo, k5.

Row 11: K6, yo, k1, p 2 tog, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p 2 tog, k1, yo, k6.

Row 13: K7, yo, k1, p1, k1, p 2 tog, k1, p 2 tog, k1, p1, k1, yo, k7.

Row 14: repeat Row 2.

Repeat Rows 1-14 for pattern until piece measures 40″, end with a Row 14. Bind off.

Sew 7 panels together.

Lace Edging:

With smaller needles, cast on 9 stitches.

Row 1 (right side): Slip (sl) 1, p2, yo, sl 1, k1, pass slip stitch over (psso), yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k2 — 10 stitches (yarn over counts as a stitch).

Row 2 and all Even Rows: purl.

Row 3: Sl 1, p3, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k2 — 11 stitches.

Row 5: Sl 1, p4, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k2 — 12 stitches.

Row 7: Sl 1, p5, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k2 — 13 stitches.

Row 9: Sl 1, p6, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k2 — 14 stitches.

Row 11: Sl 1, p4, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, k1 –13 stitches.

Row 13: Sl 1, p3, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, k1 — 12 stitches.

Row 15: Sl 1, p2, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, k1 — 11 stitches.

Row 17: Sl 1, p1, sl 1, k1, psso, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, k1 — 10 stitches.

Row 19: Sl 2, k1,pass second slip stitch over, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, yo, k 2 tog, k1 — 9 stitches.

Row 20: Repeat Row 2.

Repeat Rows 1 through 20 for pattern until piece measures length to fit around 3 sides of blanket (about 3 yards), end with a Row 20. Bind off.

Sew edging to 3 sides of blanket, easing in edging to lay flat at corners.

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